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Christmas Solos I
Jingle Bells
Jolly Old Saint Nicholas
Good King Wenceslas
Away In A Manger
Go Tell It On The Mountain
We Three Kings
O Come Emmanuel

 

 

More Christmas Solos I
Here Comes Santa Claus
The Snow Lay on the Ground
Joy to the World
Over the River and Through the Woods
Do You Hear What I Hear
Blue Christmas
Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer

 

 

Christmas Solos II
God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen
I Saw Three Ships
It Came Upon a Midnight Clear
Sing We Now of Christmas
O Little Town of Bethlehem
What Child is This?
O Come, Little Children
Silent Night
Joseph Dearest, Joseph Mine
O Come, All ye Faithful
Up On the Housetop

 

 

More Christmas Solos II
We Are Santas Elves
Silver Bells
Holly Jolly Christmas
I Want a Hippoppotamus for Christmas
Angels We Have Heard on High
Let it Snow! Let it Snow! Let it Snow!
Auld Lang Syne
He is Born, the Holy Child
The Twelve Days of Christmas
Hallelujah Chorus

 

 

Christmas Solos III
We Wish You a Merry Christmas
The First Noel
My Favorite Things
Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer
O Christmas Tree
The Chipmunk Song
Carol of the Bells
Frosty the Snowman
Deck the Halls
We Need A Little Christmas
Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree

 

 

More Christmas Solos III
Angels from the Realms of Glory
White Christmas
Christmas Time is Here
Jingle Bells
Once in Royal David's City
Here We Come A-Wassailing
Suzy Snowflake
Blue Christmas
I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus
Coventry Carol
Pat-A-Pan (1, 2)
Silver and Gold

 

Christmas Solos IV
Silver Bells
Angels We Have Heard On High
Joy to The World
Parade of the Wooden Soldiers
Hark! The Herald Angels Sing
 The Holly and The Ivy
Jingle Bell Rock
There's No Place Like Home For The Holidays
A Holly Jolly Christmas
Feliz Navidad
March of theToys
It's Beginning To Look Like Christmas
The Christmas Song

 

 

More Christmas Solos IV
Santa Claus is Comin' to Town
Wonderful Christmastime
What Child is This?
O Come, O Come, Emmanuel
Snowfall
It Came Upon a Midnight Clear
Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer
Believe
Bring a Torch, Jeanette, Isabella
Lo, How a Rose E'er Blooming
Do You Hear What I Hear
O Holy Night

 

Christmas Solos V
Still, Still, Still
Mary Had a Baby
I Wonder As I Wonder
The Christmas Waltz
Tennessee Christmas
Toyland
Mr. Santa
Jingle Bell Classic
Let it Snow!
God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen
March
Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy

 

More Christmas Solos V
Christmas Time is Here
O Little Town of Bethlehem
White Christmas
Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring
Skating
Somewhere in My Memory
Carol of the Bells
Where Are You Christmas?
We Need a Little Christmas
Auld Lang Syne

 

Christmas Favorites Book 1
Away in a Manger
Jingle Bells
What Child is This?
O Come, O Come, Emmanuel
I Saw Three Ships
God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen
O Little Town of Bethlehem
Silent Night
Joy to the World
Deck the Hall
Ukranian Bell Carol
Away in a Manger (Cradle Song)
We Wish You A Merry Christmas

 

Christmas Favorites Book 2
Angels We Have Heard on High
Bring a Torch Jeanette Isabella
Ding Dong Merrily on High
Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy
The First Noel
Go Tell it On the Mountain
Hark! The Herald Angels Sing
The Holly and the Ivy
O Christmas Tree
O Holy Night
Still, Still, Still
We Three Kings of Orient Are

Co

   

STUDIO PIANO INFORMATION PAGE

 


 


Monday and Tuesday, January 30-31, 2017

Bell ringer: Define  Articulation in Piano Technique (handout)



Standards/GLE

Rehearse to refine technical accuracy, expressive qualities, and identified performance challenges.  


With substantial guidance, explore and experience a variety of music.


Objective:

The students will apply expression marks to technique and/or  performance repertoire. The students apply legato technique to sight-reading activities.




Materials: Bell Ringer/handout, teacher work station/computer projector, student desktop computers,  electric piano/keyboards, student folders/three-ring binders,  



Teaching/Learning Activities: (Must align with the objective)

Direct Instruction/Lecture/Video: Articulation Marks video


Instructional Activities: “Loud and Soft/Same Pitch” (Music Ace Session 12)






Guided Practice: Group Piano Sessions (grouped by age; preparing for Tourgee DeBose National Piano Competition) Groups A and B

  1. Warm-Up

                            A.   Hanon No. 38

                            B.    Hanon No. 1 (RH; asc. only)

                  II. Sight-Reading

                            A.   Melodic and Harmonic 2nds and 3rds

                            B.    Moving Up & Down the Keyboard in 2nds and 3rds  (apply legato articulation)





Independent Practice: MUSIC ACE Computer Assessments (SLT) Sessions 1-4 and 12

                                        MUSIC ACE 2  Computer Assessments (SLT) Sessions 3 or 22



Checking for Understanding: See bell ringer.



Accommodations: Students who began the course during the second semester are not required to perform on piano; but they are required to complete MUSIC ACE Computer Assessments (SLT) and Music History written assignments.



Homework: None



Closure: More on Music Articulation (video)







 

Wednesday/Thursday, February  1-2, 2017

Bell ringer: Silent Reading: “The Early Piano” (handout)


 

Standards/GLE

Identity how cultural and historical context inform performances and result in different musical effects.


Objective: The students will relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural and historical context to deepen understanding. The students identify the style of music indicative of the Classical Period.

The students will learn to perform in the Baroque style by studying the works of Baroque composer, Domenico Scarlatti.



Materials:



Teaching/Learning Activities: (Must align with the objective)

Direct Instruction:

Direct Instruction/Lecture/Video: The First Piano


The piano was invented in 1700 by Italian harpsichord maker, Bartolomeo Cristofori. Here's a brief history of the instrument and a short performance on a replica of the Cristofori piano. Learn how the piano got it's name, what the middle pedal does and what the first pianos sounded like.


Learn more about the piano here: http://www.gistpianocenter.com/pianos... or check out the Metropolitan Museum of Art (where I got much of the text for this video): http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/cris...



Instructional Activities: Students take notes.



Guided Practice: Written Assignment: Listening Summary Format



Independent Practice: Daily Practice Routine (Groups A and B)

  1. Warm-Up (Technique) Hanon No. 38C (hands together)

  2. Sight-Reading: Hanon No. 1 (RH; asc. only)

  3. New Repertoire (for Tourgee DeBose National Piano Competition; students

                            divided based on age)





Checking for Understanding: Review Classical Keyboard Instruments



Accommodations: The lesson assessment is participatory.



Homework: None



Closure: Listening





Thu/Fri, January 25-26, 2017   

Bell ringer: Students research the names of other Baroque composers (not including Bach, Handel, and Scarlatti)



Standards/GLE Identity how cultural and historical context inform performances and result in different musical effects.



Objective: (Must align with the Standard/GLE) 2- 5 minutes

The students will learn to play piano by observing piano performances appreciating the keyboard music of the Baroque Era.



Materials:



Teaching/Learning Activities: (Must align with the objective)

Direct Instruction/Modeling/ Informance (Teacher performs the music of primary Baroque composers.)


  1. Bach French Suites (Movements 1 and 2)

  2. Handel Sonatina in A minor

  3. Scarlatti Sonata in A Major



Instructional Activities: Discussion

Compare the works of Bach, Handel, and Scarlatti.



Guided Practice:  



Independent Practice: Daily Practice Routine (Group C a& D)

  1. Warm-Up (Technique) Hanon No. 38C (hands together)

  2. Sight-Reading:

                            A. Studio Piano I Hanon No. 1 (RH; asc. only)

                            B. Studio Piano II-III Hanon No. 4

  1. New Repertoire (for Tourgee DeBose National Piano Competition; students divided based on age)  

 





Checking for Understanding: Review Baroque Composers



Accommodations: The students collect the names of Baroque composers from their peers. (Each students will be assigned a selection by a Baroque composer. The name and date of the Baroque selection is on each score.  Each person has to ask their “peer” for the name/date of the composer of their Baroque selection.



Homework: None


Closure: Listening “Keyboard Music of the Baroque Era”





Tues/Wed, Jan. 24-25, 2017   

Bell ringer: Composer Review Domenico Scarlatti (handout)


Standards/GLE

Identity how cultural and historical context inform performances and result in different musical effects.


Objective:

The students will learn to perform in the Baroque style by studying the works of Baroque composer, Domenico Scarlatti.



Materials:



Teaching/Learning Activities: (Must align with the objective)

Direct Instruction: Lecture “Domenico Scarlatti”



Instructional Activities: Students take notes.



Guided Practice: Written Assignment: Listening Summary Format



Independent Practice: Daily Practice Routine (Groups A and B)

  1. Warm-Up (Technique) Hanon No. 38C (hands together)

  2. Sight-Reading: Hanon No. 1 (RH; asc. only)

  3. New Repertoire (for Tourgee DeBose National Piano Competition; students

                            divided based on age)





Checking for Understanding: TBA



Accommodations: The lesson assessment is participatory.



Homework: None



Closure: Listening “The Keyboard Music of Domenico Scartlatti”




 

 

Bell ringer: Composer Review Domenico Scarlatti (handout)


Standards/GLE

Identity how cultural and historical context inform performances and result in different musical effects.


Objective:

The students will learn to perform in the Baroque style by studying the works of Baroque composer, Domenico Scarlatti.



Materials:



Teaching/Learning Activities: (Must align with the objective)

Direct Instruction: Lecture “Domenico Scarlatti”



Instructional Activities: Students take notes.



Guided Practice: Written Assignment: Listening Summary Format



Independent Practice: Daily Practice Routine (Groups A and B)

  1. Warm-Up (Technique) Hanon No. 38C (hands together)

  2. Sight-Reading: Hanon No. 1 (RH; asc. only)

  3. New Repertoire (for Tourgee DeBose National Piano Competition; students

                            divided based on age)





Checking for Understanding: TBA



Accommodations: The lesson assessment is participatory.



Homework: None



Closure: Listening “The Keyboard Music of Domenico Scartlatti”







MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 2016

 

Bell ringer:  Practice Session [prepare for Performance Assessment: Hanon No. 38C (both hands)]




Standards/GLE

Apply teacher provided criteria to critique individual performances of a varied repertoire of music that includes melodies, repertoire pieces, and chordal accompaniments selected for performance, and apply practice strategies to address performance challenges and refine the performances.



The students will relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural and historical context to deepen understanding.


With substantial guidance, explore and experience a variety of music.


Objective: (Must align with the Standard/GLE) 2- 5 minutes

The students will learn to play piano by performing Exercise No. 38C by Charles Louis Hanon before a peer audience with 88% accuracy.


The students will review the keyboard instruments of the Baroque era and learn about how the pipe organ (a Baroque keyboard instrument) is made.


Materials: Pens/pencils and paper, tecaching computer/workstation and computer projector, i Internet access,  electronic keyboards and pianos.



Teaching/Learning Activities: (Must align with the objective)

Direct Instruction/Lecture/Video: “How it’s Made: The Pipe Organ”




Instructional Activities: Lecture and Note Taking


Guided Practice: Listening Summary (written notes and summary paragraph)



Independent Practice:  (see bell ringer)



Checking for Understanding:

 

1) Performance Assessment (after bell ringer) Hanon No. 38C (both hands)

 

2) Listening  Assessment (after video/lecture)Review the keyboard instruments of the Baroque Era (Kahoot)



Accommodations: Students who’ve joined the class for the second semester, without any music experience, are exempt from performance assessments.



Homework: None



Closure:  Piano Scales...Why bother?




 

THU., JANUARY 19, 2017

Bell Ringer: Composer: Frederic Handel (handout)




Standards/GLE

The students will relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural and historical context to deepen understanding.


Objective:

The students will learn about Frederic Handel. The students will complete a daily practice routine.



Materials: Bell Ringer (handouts), Teacher Computer Workstation and Projector, Internet access, student notebooks, pens/pencils and paper,



Teaching/Learning Activities: Listening Summary and Video George Frederic Handel

Direct Instruction/Modeling/Concept Formation:   

Group Lessons at the Pianos/Keyboards.

Group B: Use the organ voice settings to perform the Interval Etude.




Instructional Activities:  

Group C: Complete the Interval Review Sheet (written)




Guided Practice:  Group D: Work on Music Ace 2 (Session 22: Intervals)



Independent Practice

Group A: Spend time surveying and listening to new selection for practice: Sonata in G (Cimerosa)

 

Checking for Understanding: Submit listening summary



Accommodations: Students are divided into cooperative groups based on age. The are assigned selections to perform from the Tourgee DeBose National Piano Competition repertoire list for “Late Starters”.



Homework: None



Closure: Bach vs Handel


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2017

Bell ringer:  (Must align with the objective) Composer Sheet: Bach (handout)



Standards/GLE

The students will relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural and historical context to deepen understanding.



Objective:

The students will learn about Bach. The students will learn to play piano by completing a daily practice routine.



Materials:


Teaching/Learning Activities: (Must align with the objective) Lecture: Johann Sebastien Bach (Biography)

The short biography about Johann Sebastian Bach: it is compact fun: your experience the "Lebensreise" ( ... journey through life) of Bach from Eisenach to Leipzig. You listen to the music on this "Lebensreise" and a professional narrates the text of the "Lebensreise" of Johann Sebastian Bach. You will listen to the music of the master, but not only to his music. You experience historic documents and nowadays photos of the Bach cities and Bach places. Plus there is a tiny genealogy about this family of musicians.




Direct Instruction/Modeling/Concept Formation:

Listening Summary: Johann Sebastian Bach







Instructional Activities:  

Group Piano Session(s) (Group B and C)

  1. Warm- Up - Hanon No. 38 (hands together)

  2. Sight-Reading - Intervals of a 2nd and 3rd

  3. Drill and Practice -

Guided Practice:



Independent Practice

Note: Students share their biographies/listening summaries with a partner.


Checking for Understanding: Submit listening summaries for credit points.

 


Accommodations: Students are grouped according to age to study selections for the DeBose National Piano Competition.


Homework: None



Closure: Listening to New Repertoire

Prepare for the DeBose Piano Competition

         A. Group A Sonata in G (Cimerosa)

         B. Group B Little Piece from  Album for the Young (Schumann)

         C. Group C Jumping Rope from  Children’s Album Vol. 2 (Khatchaturian)

         D. Group D Scenes from Childhood Kinderscenen (Schumann)

 E. Group E  Sonata in G Major




FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2017

Bell ringer: Practice Sessions, Drill Hanon Finger Exercises

Studio Piano I: Hanon No. 38C (hands together)

Studio Piano II-III:  Hanon  No. 3 (hands together)



Standards/GLE

Demonstrate technical skill in applying principles of piano technique.


Objective:

The students will perform  Hanon  finger exercises from The Virtuoso Pianist by Charles Louis Hanon.



Materials: Electric Piano, Musical Score from The Virtuoso Pianist by Charles Louis  Hanon , Performance Assessment Scoring Sheet,  




Instructional Activities: Lecture “Piano Scales - Why Bother?”


Guided Practice:



Independent See bell ringer.



Checking for Understanding: Performance Assessment Exercise No. 38 from The Virtuoso Pianist by Charles Louis Hanon








Accommodations:

 

Students who entered the second semester did not receive instruction on Hanon Finger exercises. They are exempt from performance assessments. They are required to complete the music history lessons and written assignments and Music Ace Computer assessments (SLT).





Homework: None



Closure:





MONDAY-TUESDAY, JANUARY 9 & 10, 2017

Objective(s)
:
(SWBA)
The students will learn about the Baroque era by reviewing previous lesson notes (Kahoot Online Game) The students will learn about the keyboard instruments of the Baroque era by taking lecture notes and completing a listening summary on a video lecture. The students will learn to play piano by working in  grade level groups to prepare for the DeBose National Piano competition.

Bell Ringer: Music History: Baroque Era

Anticipatory Set: (Hook)  Baroque Era Keyboard Music

Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW)

Lecture: From the Clavichord to the Modern Piano (Part 1 and Part 2)





Guided Practice: (TW/SW)

Group Piano Sessions (Group A and B)

  1. Warm- Up - Hanon No. 38 (hands together)

  2. Sight-Reading - Intervals of a 2nd and 3rd

  3. Drill and Practice - New Repertoire (Prepare for the DeBose Piano Competition)

            A. Group A Sonata in G (Cimerosa)

            B. Group B Little Piece from  Album for the Young (Schumann)

            C. Group C Jumping Rope from  Children’s Album Vol. 2 (Khatchaturian)

            D. Group D Scenes from Childhood Op. 15  No. 1

                Kinderscenen (Schumann)

           E. Group E  Sonata in G (Scarlatti)


Independent Practice:

Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket:



Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment:
Listening Summary (Written Assignment) : Keyboard Instruments of the Baroque Era
Music Ace Computer Assessments Session 1 and 2

Materials:
 
THURSDAY- FRIDAY, JANUARY 5 & 6, 2017

Bell ringer: Student Behavior Assessment (handout)

The overall objective is for students to identify  behavior that will lead to completing assignments and being more engaged in classroom work.



Standards/GLE

The students will relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural and historical context to deepen understanding.


Objective:

The student will learn how to understand piano construction and relate it to the  piano technique necessary to play piano. The students will gain an overview of western music history.


Materials: Pens/pencils and paper.



Teaching/Learning Activities:

Direct Instruction/Modeling/Concept Formation:

Lecture/Video: The Construction of the the Piano




Instructional Activities:  

Written Listening Summary: Who, What, When, Where, Why


Notes: The Steinway Piano factory is a large warehouse with over 500 workers. Bob Berger manages the large woodshop.  The rim of a piano is formed with flexible planks of maple. The soundboard of a piano is made of spruce because it is elastic. Wiring a piano is extremely complicated and requires the hand of a master. In order to tune a piano precisely, each key is tested and adjusted.


Guided Practice:

Demonstrate note taking process on the board, in front of the class.


Independent Practice: 

The students write summary paragraphs on their own paper and turn in for credit.


Checking for Understanding: The students read paragraphs aloud to partnering students.



Accommodations: See guided practice.



Homework: None



Closure: Overview of the History of Western Music.

Pianos were invented in 1709. However they were not the only keyboard instruments available to keyboardist. The clavichord, harpsichord, and organ preceded the piano.

  1. Lecture - Overview of the History of Western Music

  2. Chart

  3. Students take notes.




 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Emergency Substitute Plans
 
 

Objective(s): (SWBAT) The students review and drill  Hanon No. 6. The students sight-read and rehearse the Entertainer (Joplin).


Bell Ringer: Hanon No. 6 (Demo)


Anticipatory Set: (Hook) Hanon No. 6 (Tutorial)


Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) Group Session I. Sight-Read "The Entertainer" (page one; lines 3 and 4)


Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Individual Lesson Schedule



Independent Practice: Daily Practice Routine

I. Warm Up (Technique) Hanon 1-4 and 6

II. Drill and Practice    

    A. The Entertainer (page one)    

   B. Spinning Top (entire)


Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Complete the daily practice routine.


Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment: Music Ace Session (SLT) Music Ace Session 13 and 14


Materials: Teacher Computer-Workstation, Student desktop computers, keyboards/electric pianos/synthesizers, black folders for students' music/notes/repertoire

Objective(s): (SWBAT) The students review chord progressions in C Major.The students participate in a piano master class. Selected students perform before a peer audience for bonus credit points. . Audience members (peer audience) rate the students’ performances. Selected students prepare for the Spring Piano recital by performing before a peer audience.


Bell Ringer: Students warm-up for 15 minutes. Review chord progressions in C Major (handout).


Anticipatory Set: (Hook) Jazz Master Class: Introduction to Improvision


Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) Lecture: “What is a Master Class”

A master class is a class given to students of a particular discipline by an expert of that discipline—usually music, but also painting, drama, any of the arts, or on any other occasion where skills are being developed.

The difference between a normal class and a master class is typically the setup. In a master class, all the students (and often spectators) watch and listen as the master takes one student at a time. The student (typically intermediate or advanced, depending on the status of the master) usually performs a single piece which they have prepared, and the master will give them advice on how to play it, often including anecdotes about the composer, demonstrations of how to play certain passages, and admonitions of common technical errors. The student is then usually expected to play the piece again, in light of the master's comments, and the student may be asked to play a passage repeatedly to attain perfection. Master classes for musical instruments tend to focus on the finer details of attack, tone, phrasing, and overall shape, and the student is expected to have complete control of more basic elements such as rhythm and pitch. The value of the master class setup is that all students can benefit from the master's comments on each piece.

 


Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Master Class

  1. Bonus Credit for performers
  2. Peer audience members rate each performance based on specified criteria. The student performers receive bonus credit based on the average rating: (.1- 25 points)

Independent Practice: See bell ringer.


Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Selected students give performers feedback on how to improve their overall performance.


Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment: Peer Rating Sheets receive credit. Students who perform will receive bonus points for performing based on the average score from the peer rating sheet.


Materials: Internet Access, Teacher Computer/Workstation and Projector, Electric Piano, Peer Rating Sheets


Objective(s): (SWBAT)

The students survey the life, career and music of Claude Debussy.

The students determine the correlation between music and art in impressionism.

The students listen to the piano music of Claude Debussy.

The students create images that represent their interpretation of Debussy’s piano music.

The students discuss their images in peer groups, explaining how their images relate to the music they've heard. 

The students compare impressionism to jazz/ragtime.

The students complete a daily practice routine.

The students prepare for the annual Spring Piano Recital by practicing solo duet, and required repertoire.




Bell Ringer: Claude Debussy (Handout; Answers)

Anticipatory Set: (Hook) Lecture: Impressionism in Music and Art
Impressionism was mostly a movement in art.
   .

 (Note: Before that, artists' works were very realistic. See sample of "realism" in art. .)

Claude Debussy was one of the primary composers of Impressionist music. He wrote music for children.(Listening Samples) 
       


Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) Listening Summary: Claude Debussy (Student led activity)
Directions: Use the standard listening summary format to survey the life, career, and music of Claude Debussy.
Claude Debussy


Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Create  and Discuss Impressionist Art
I. Listen to the music of Debussy.
    A. The Snow is Dancing        
    B. Jimbo's Lullaby         
    C. The Little Shepherd 
II. Use pencil and paper to create the images that you imagine.
III. Afterwards, use watercolors paint to add color to your pencil image.
IV.  Use the completed image to discuss your interpretation of Debussy's music. Make sure to tell your peers the name of the selection that your image represents. Explain your image and why you selected the colors.


Independent Practice: Daily Practice Routine
I. Warm-Up (Technique) Hanon No. 6
II. Sight-Reading: 
    A. The Entertainer
    B. Watercolors (Hal Leonard; handout)
III. Drill and Practice: Review the Introduction
IV. Computer Music Assessments (SLT) Music Ace Session 14


Daily Practice Routine


 

Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Complete the artist rendering. Complete the routine listening summary Complete the daily practice routine.

Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment: (see Bell Ringer).
1. Debussy was born in what country?
2. The style of music that Debussy created was called ______________________.

3. Debussy liked to experiment with the strict rules of composition (True or False).
4. How is Jazz (Ragtime music) different from Impressionist music?

Computer Music Assessments (SLT) Music Ace Session 14 (see computer schedule)


Materials: Handouts for Bell Ringer (Meet the Composers), Teacher Computer Workstation and Projector, Desktop Computers for Student Use, Internet Access,  Art Supplies for Student Images, Pencils, Student folders, with Piano Assignments, Electric Keyboards and Pianos

Objective(s): (SWBAT)The students partiacipate in the Spring piano recital as performers or audience members. The students compare the music of Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary eras through active listening.


Bell Ringer: Review the Behavior Expectations for Piano Recitals (re: Audience members don't talk during piano performances.)

Anticipatory Set: (Hook) Recital Program Format


Independent Practice:  Selected students perform independently before a peer audience.

Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Closing Remarks at the end of Piano Recital

Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment:
Materials:
 
 
Objective(s): (SWBAT)The students partiacipate in the Spring piano recital as performers or audience members. The students compare the music of Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary eras through active listening.


Bell Ringer: Review the Behavior Expectations for Piano Recitals (re: Audience members don't talk during piano performances.)

Anticipatory Set: (Hook) Recital Program Format

Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW)

Guided Practice: (TW/SW)

Independent Practice:  Selected students perform independently before a peer audience.

Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Closing Remarks at the end of Piano Recital

Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment:
Materials:

Note: This lesson was not taught on Wednesday. Classes were at the school wide Spring Concert. Therefore it will be taught on Thursday.

Objective(s):
(SWBAT)
The students survey the life, music, and career of Modest Mussorgsky. The students sight-read  the main theme of "Pictures at an Exhibition" (simplified) by Modest Mussorgsky. The students listen to and compare the theme of "Pictures at an Exhibition" to other impressionst works. The students learn to play the main theme of "The Entertainer" with hands together  in order to perform for the final exam (performance assessment).


Bell Ringer: Modest Mussorgksy. (Reading/Article Handout) Russian artist and architect Victor Hartman was a good friend of Modest Mussorgsky. When Hartman died at the age of 39, there was a memorial exhibit of his work. That inspired Mussorgsky to create his own tribute to Hartman -- a composition depicting ten pieces of art from the exhibit. "Pictures at an Exhibition" was originally written for solo piano, but quite a few people have made orchestral versions of the piece. The best-known one is by Maurice Ravel.


Anticipatory Set: (Hook) Listening: Pictures at an Exhibition
Pictures at an Exhibition
Music heard in this episode: Mussorgsky: Selections from Pictures at an Exhibition Mussorgsky: Promenade Mussorgsky: Gnome Mussorgsky: Old Castle Mussorgsky: Tuileries Mussorgsky: Bydlo Mussorgsky: Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks Mussorgsky: Samual Goldenberg and Schmuyle Mussorgsky: Limoges Mussorgsky: Catacvombae Mussorgsky: Conmortuis in Lingua Mortua Mussorgsky: Hut on Fowl's Legs Mussorgsky: Great Gate of Kiev

 


Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) Listening Summary: Pictures At An Exhibition  (Students led)                                                                                    


Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Group Session I - Pictures at an Exhibition (simplied-handout) 


Independent Practice: Daily Practice Routine
I. Technique (Warm Up) I
I. Sight-Read Pictures at an Exhibition (hand out)
III. Drill and Practice The Enterainer (Drill hands together)


Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Complete the daily practice routine


Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment:Music Ace Computer Assessments (SLT) Session 15-16


Materials:

Objective(s): (SWBAT) The students survey the life, music, and career of Modest Mussorgksy. The students sight-read  the main theme of "Pictures at an Exhibition" (simplified) by Modest Mussorgsky. The students listen to and compare the theme of "Pictures at an Exhibition" to other impressionst works. The students learn to play the main theme of "The Entertainer" with hands together  in order to perform for the final exam (performance assessment).


Bell Ringer: Modest Mussorgksy. (Reading/Article Handout) Russian artist and architect Victor Hartman was a good friend of Modest Mussorgsky. When Hartman died at the age of 39, there was a memorial exhibit of his work. That inspired Mussorgsky to create his own tribute to Hartman -- a composition depicting ten pieces of art from the exhibit. "Pictures at an Exhibition" was originally written for solo piano, but quite a few people have made orchestral versions of the piece. The best-known one is by Maurice Ravel.


Anticipatory Set: (Hook) Listening: Pictures at an Exhibition
Pictures at an Exhibition
Music heard in this episode: Mussorgsky: Selections from Pictures at an Exhibition Mussorgsky: Promenade Mussorgsky: Gnome Mussorgsky: Old Castle Mussorgsky: Tuileries Mussorgsky: Bydlo Mussorgsky: Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks Mussorgsky: Samual Goldenberg and Schmuyle Mussorgsky: Limoges Mussorgsky: Catacvombae Mussorgsky: Conmortuis in Lingua Mortua Mussorgsky: Hut on Fowl's Legs Mussorgsky: Great Gate of Kiev

 


Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) Listening Summary: Pictures At An Exhibition  (Students led)                                                                                    


Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Group Session I - Pictures at an Exhibition (simplied-handout)


Independent Practice: Daily Practice Routine I. Technique (Warm Up) II. Sight-Read Pictures at an Exhibition (hand out) III. Drill and Practice Individual Repertoire


Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Complete the daily practice routine


Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment:Music Ace Computer Assessments (SLT) Session 15-16


Materials:

Objective(s): (SWBAT) The students survey the life, music, and career of Maurice Ravel.


Bell Ringer: Maurice Ravel (Word Search Handout)


Anticipatory Set: (Hook) Listening Maurice Ravel - "Le tombeau de Couperin" by Angela Hewitt

Joseph-Maurice Ravel (March 7, 1875 – December 28, 1937) was a French composer known especially for his melodies, orchestral and instrumental textures and effects. Along with Claude Debussy, he was one of the most prominent figures associated with Impressionist music. Much of his piano music, chamber music, vocal music and orchestral music has entered the standard concert repertoire.

Ravel's piano compositions, such as Jeux d'eau, Miroirs, Le tombeau de Couperin and Gaspard de la nuit, demand considerable virtuosity from the performer, and his orchestral music, including Daphnis et Chloé and his arrangement of Modest Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition, use a variety of sound and instrumentation. Ravel is perhaps known best for his orchestral work Boléro (1928), which he considered trivial and once described as "a piece for orchestra without music".

 


Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) Maurice Ravel


Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Individual Lesson Schedule


Independent Practice: Daily Practice Routine
I. Technique (Warm Up)
II. Sight-Read (The Entertainer - RH melody)
III. Drill and Practice (The Entertainer - LH)


Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Complete the daily practice routine


Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment:Music Ace Computer Assessments (SLT) Session 15-16


Materials:

Objective(s): (SWBAT) The students will take a look at the sharp sign, the flat sign, half steps and whole steps. The students will  identify  3 major keys. These major keys are C major, F major and G major. Also, we will learn about the C, F and G major five finger scales.


Bell Ringer: Sharp and Flat Signs, Half Steps and Whole Steps, Keys of C, G, and F Major

Note: Final Exam Requirements (handout)


Anticipatory Set: (Hook) Music Ace Lesson: Sharps and Flats on the Staff 

Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW)  Listening "The Entertainer" (Bastien; simplified)

Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Master Theory Lesson 27: The Flat -- Sharp -- Natural

Independent Practice: Daily Practice Routine
I. Warm-Up (Technique)
    A. Hanon No 6 (ascending and descending)
    B. Haonn Nos. 1-4
II. Slght-Reading "The Entertainer " and Etude (Bastien)
    A. "The Entertainer" (Bastien)
        1. Melody (lines three and four; page one RH only)
        2. Harmony (Left Hand)
    B. Etude
 III. Drill and practice
       A.  "The Entertainer" (Bastien)
       B. Repertoire or Hanon drills (preparation for the Final Exam)

Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Complete Master Theory Lesson 27: The Flat -- Sharp -- Natural

Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment: Computer Assessments (SLT) Music Ace  15 and 16
Materials:

Objective(s): (SWBAT) The students play Hanon No. 6, from the Virtuoso Pianist with both hands, (ascending and descending). Students sight-read "Etude" and perform in C, G, and F positions. The students perform the right hand of the Entertainer in "group class" format.

Bell Ringer: Group I Chords (handout; from Bastien's Older Beginner Book One)

Anticipatory Set: (Hook)  Listening "The Entertainer" (Bastien; simplified)

Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) Group Session
I. Warm-Up (Hanon Nos. 1-6
II. Sight-Reading - Etude
III. Drill and Practice The Entertainer

Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Independent Lesson Schedule

Independent Practice: Daily practice routine.  

Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket:

Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment: Peer Assessments (Quantitative; video documents. )
Materials:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
EOC Testing Schedule (Note: students attendance is varied because of testing. Therefore, students are focusing on completing SLT requirements (see Computer Schedule).  Students are organizing work folders and review previous written assignments. The students  are practicing to prepare for final performance assessments).  



Objective(s):
(SWBAT)
The selected students complete Music Ace Computer Assessment 15 and 16. The students identify and review the notes below the bass staff. The students differentiate between same and differenct pitches. The students complete a daily practice routine. The students perform selections for bonus credit performances.

Bell Ringer: Review Bass Clef Note Names

Anticipatory Set: (Hook) Lecture: Differentiate Between Pitch and Volume 

Pitch vs volume. Loudness and pitch are characteristics of sounds. Loudness refers to the magnitude of the sound heard, and pitch is related to here are some more compilation of topics and latest discussions relates to this video, which we found thorough the internet. Hope this information will helpful to get idea in brief about this. The difference between pitch and volume is that pitch is determined by the frequency that sound waves vibrate at while volume measures how loud or soft sound . Below information will help you to get some more though about the subject what do pitch and volume mean when talking about sound waves? if i play this sound here, and then i play this sound, can you tell what the difference is? sound waves, then what exactly about the waves is different between the two?. Pitch is what distinguishes a high note from a low note. There is no direct proportionality between volume and amplitude, but when one rises, difference between pitch and volume?if a sound is high pitched ,doesn't it mean that sound is loud?
 

Guided Practice: (TW/SW)  Individual Lesson Schedule

Independent Practice: Daily Practice Routine
I. Hanon No. 1-4, and 6
II. Sight Reading N/A
III. Drill and Practice Repertoire
    A. The Entertainer (Simplified; Bastien)
    B. Spnning Top (Hauber)
    C. Watercolors (Hal Leonard: Book Two) 
  

Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Complete the following:
I. Computer Assessments
II. Daily Practice Routine

Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment: Music Ace Computer Assessments (SLT) Sessions 15 and 16
Materials:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Objective(s): (SWBAT) The students identify the life, career, and music of Clara Schumann.

Bell Ringer: Clara Schumann (handout)

Anticipatory Set: (Hook)

Before she was even born, Clara Schumann’s father had determined that she would be a star at the keyboard. Her father, Fredrich Wieck, was a piano teacher, and he saw to it that she studied music, performed and composed – all at an early age. Clara toured all over Europe, wowing audiences with her playing, and her compositions.

When Clara fell in love with Robert Schumann, who was studying with her father, Friedrich Wieck tried hard to stop them from getting married. It took years -- and a court battle -- before Robert and Clara could finally get married. But Clara and Robert Schumann became one of the greatest musical partnerships of all time. She gave the first performance of many of his pieces, including his piano concerto and was a tremendous influence on his music. She also premiered works by Chopin and Brahms. Even though she gave birth to eight children, and had great family responsibilities, Robert encouraged her compose. When Robert got sick, and after his early death, Clara supported her family by giving concerts and teaching. She continued to perform into her 70’s.



Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) Clara Schumann

Guided Practice: (TW/SW)  Individual Lesson Schedules

Independent Practice: Daily Practice Routine
I. Technique - Hanon No. 6
II. Repertoire - Drill competitive repertoire

Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Complete and submit the composer review sheet and listening summary on Clara Schumann.
Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment: See bell ringer (review sheet)
Materials:
Tals:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 





 

 Tourgee DeBose Online Repertoire Tourgee DeBose National Piano Competition