Our Program

 

 

 

   
CHAPTER ONE

Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3                      

CHAPTER TWO
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3   

CHAPTER THREE
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER FOUR
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER FIVE
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER SIX
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER SEVEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER EIGHT
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER NINE
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER TEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER ELEVEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER 17
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER 18
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER 19
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER 21
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER 24
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3  

 

LESSON PLANS
WEEK ONE
WEEK TWO
WEEK THREE
WEEK FOUR
WEEK FIVE
WEEK SIX
WEEK SEVEN
WEEK EIGHT
WEEK NINE
WEEK TEN
WEEK ELEVEN
WEEK TWELVE
WEEK THIRTEEN
WEEK FOURTEEN
WEEK FIFTEEN
WEEK SIXTEEN
WEEK SEVENTEEN
WEEK EIGHTEEN

 
  FINE ARTS SURVEY COURSE SYLLABUS    
     
 

 Fine Arts Survey: CHAPTER ONE

Music in Our Culture (Overview)

Music is one of the great pleasures of life.

It has the power to command our attention and inspire us. It speaks to our spirit and to our inner feelings. It provokes thoughts about the mysteries of life, such as why we exist, the vastness of the universe, and our purpose on earth. Music reaches deep into our nature to console us, to reassure us, and to help us express who and what we are as human beings. There are as many different kinds of music in the United States as there are different peoples. The variety of musical styles tells us who we are as a nation.

What does your favorite music say about you?

Music is one of the ways in which we define who we are as individuals and as a society. Through music and the other arts, we express our cultural lifestyles as Americans. Music gives us a rich and unique heritage. All we have to do is open our ears and our minds. We can learn to appreciate the great variety that surrounds us by becoming perceptive listeners.

 

CHAPTER ONE - DAY 1

BELL RINGER  "What does music appreciation mean to you?"

 

HOOK   Effect of Music on American Culture (video)

 

I. Course Description

II. Introduction to Chapter One:

   A. Chapter Overview

   B. Written Assignment:  Vocabulary Terms

        1. classical music  -  the style of "art" music as distinguished from folk, jazz, or popular music; European music of the Classical period (composed between 1750 to 1825)

        2. concerto - a composition usually written in three lengthy sections or movements featuring the interplay between one or more soloist and an orchestra

        3. culture - is the customs, ideas, tastes, and beliefs acquired from a person's background  

        4. homophony - a single melody with chordal accompaniment

        5. jazz - is a popular style of music that developed in America during the late 1800's  and early 1900's

        6. musical style - refers to the distinct manner or character of musical expression

        7. perceptive listening - the ability to discern musical characteristics and describe them

 

     C. Listening Assessment

           1.  Directions: Indicate whether the music excerpts is classical music or not by choosing the style of each music excerpt.

             2. Listening Assignment  (Pre-Test)

     

          

CHAPTER ONE - DAY 2 

"WHAT IS JAZZ?"

 

Bell Ringer:   "What type of music do you prefer?"

 
Objective(s): (SWBAT) The students define Jazz as an American style of music. The students survey and compare different styles of Jazz music. The students summarize the life of Wynton Marsalis.



Anticipatory Set: (Hook) Wynton Marsalis (website)
 

Although he was born in New Orleans, a city known for jazz, Wynton Marsalis started out as a classical musician. Guided by his musician father, Marsalis picked up the trumpet when he was twelve, and within two years he had joined the New Orleans Symphony Orchestra. He later attended the Julliard School of Music in New York.

          It was in New York that Marsalis first became interested in jazz. He began going to libraries, museums, and clubs to read about, listen to, and meet jazz musicians. Marsalis' background in classical music and his love of jazz proved to be a winning combination. He became a recognized recording artist by the age of 20.

         Marsalis now focuses most of his energies on jazz. He spends much of his time visiting schools to encourage an interest in this style of music among American youth. Wynton Marsalis has become a major force in American music, winning Grammy awards in both jazz and classical categories in 1984. He became Artistic Director of the jazz program at New York City's Lincoln Center in 1991 and won a Pulitzer Prize in music in 1997.



Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) Wynton Marsalis 1985 Profile: "Catching a Snake"
"Catching a Snake" is a 1985 documentary produced by A&E. This 52 minute profile follows Wynton from his childhood home in New Orleans, through the jazz clubs of New Orleans.

Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Complete a listening summary.
Note: The instructor emphasizes the main points of the video lecture.

Independent Practice: Write a paragraph biography on Wynton Marsalis.

Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket:  "What is Jazz?" (Video presentation from the Educational video network)


Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment: Written Assessment (or Study Guide for "What is Jazz"

 

Closure: "Jazztime"   

CHAPTER ONE - DAY 3

   Bell Ringer   "How does learning more about the composer help you when listening to his or her music?"

 

HOOK    "What is Jazz?"  and Two Cellos 

Objectives   The students will learn about Western Music History and Jazz through discussion. The students will learn about Western Music History and Jazz via written assessment

Direct Instruction

 

    I. Lecture:  Western Music History Timeline (Directions: Take notes; create a chart in your note book.)

          A. Middle Ages

          B. Renaissance

          C. Baroque

          D. Classical

          E. Romantic

          F. Contemporary

     II.     "Western Music History" 

     III. Independent Practice

      Perceptive Listening (Copy Notes)

         Perceptive listening is the ability to discern musical characteristics and describe them. These characteristics are both internal (dealing with sound) and external (dealing with the social aspects). In its sound, every piece of music uses a distinctive means (the source of sound),  expressive (feeling), and order (organization).  In its social aspects, every musical piece has a distinctive origin (the where, when , and the whom the music was created) and use (function or purpose). To develop the capacity to listen perceptively, you must analyze what you hear. You need to perceive the internal and external characteristics of the work and develop the ability to describe them. For this purpose you may have to acquire some new vocabulary, or "descriptor." This new vocabulary will permit you to communicate your likes and dislikes persuasively.

   IV. Lesson Assessments and Discussions: Chapter One (pages 1, 2)

 

          Directions: Complete the written quiz while we review and discuss the following questions.  

        

        A. Haydn and Mozart are associated with what musical period?

        B. When and where did the musical style we call "jazz" first develop?

        C. What are some of the characteristics of jazz?

        D. Identify three internal characteristics of music.

        E.  Identify two external characteristics of music. 

        F. What earlier culture did Classical musicians and artists look back to for inspiration?

        G. Why is it possible to distinguish between classical music and jazz simply by listening to it?

 

 

Closure  The Evolution of Music (Pentatonix)

 


              

 

       
       
         

 

 

 

edutopia


Discovering Mexico
Find out basic information on Mexico and Mexican culture.


Discovering Asia
Find out basic information on Asia and Asian Cultures.


Discovering Music
Review music fundamentals concepts.

Education Standards AddressedM-AP-H1

Benchmark 4 Explore and express basic elements of

music through voice, musical

instruments, electronic technology, or

available media (3)

Recognize and demonstrate elements of

music, using voice, musical instruments,

electronic technology, or other available

media (3, 4)

Distinguish unique characteristics of

music as it reflects concepts of beauty

and qualify of life in various cultures (1, 4, 5)

M-AP-H3 Analyze and express the impact of

music on intellect and emotions (1, 4, 5)

M-AP-H4

Compare and contrast traditional and

technological options available for

artistic expression in music (1, 4)

M-AP-H5

Question/weigh evidence and

information, examine intuitive

reactions, and articulate personal

attitudes toward musical works (1, 2, 5)

M-AP-H6

Evaluate and discuss appropriateness of

behavior for different types of musical

environments (2, 4, 5)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By completing  Chapter 17 the students will:

Find out how technology is changing the role of composers and performers.

Learn how electronic sounds are generated and how they are used for expressive purposes.

Be able to distinguish between electronically and conventionally produced sounds.

Learn the history of electronic music and the meaning of its most important terms.

Become acquainted with the work of some outstanding living arrangers and composers who use technology to create music.

Students will learn how to compose a song.


Students will learn how to use computers when creating music.


Students will be introduced to terms that are related to music.

Students will learn about the many ways to create different sounds by using computers.

How to manipulate sound to create music will be illustrated.

Students will become familiar with terms that relate to music and to computers.