Our Program

 

 

 

CHAPTER ONE

Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3                      

CHAPTER TWO
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3   

CHAPTER THREE
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER FOUR
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER FIVE
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER SIX
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER SEVEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER EIGHT
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER NINE
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER TEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER ELEVEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER 17
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER 18
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER 19
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER 21
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER 24
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3  

 

LESSON PLANS
WEEK ONE
WEEK TWO
WEEK THREE
WEEK FOUR
WEEK FIVE
WEEK SIX
WEEK SEVEN
WEEK EIGHT
WEEK NINE
WEEK TEN
WEEK ELEVEN
WEEK TWELVE
WEEK THIRTEEN
WEEK FOURTEEN
WEEK FIFTEEN
WEEK SIXTEEN
WEEK SEVENTEEN
WEEK EIGHTEEN

Fine Arts Survey: CHAPTER TEN
 
 

 

 

            The Beauty of Order (Overview)

                                                                                                 

Inside each of us, there is a constant struggle between our emotions and our intellect. We may have an urge to do something, but our judgment may put a damper on it. Our intuition tells us one thing and  reason tells us another. The reconciliation of these two extremes takes many forms. Sometimes our emotions rule, sometimes our intellect rules.

The order in music provides its continuity. Through it, we sense the way the music is put together, from the smallest motive to its complete work. To this order the performer applies emotions, resulting in a performance that touches us deeply.

 

MONDAY

I. Introduction to Chapter 10

   A. Chapter Overview

   B. Written Assignment:  Vocabulary Terms

        1. aleatory music Music with sections that are left undetermined, or left to chance.

        2. fugue A polyphonic composition consisting of a series of successive melody imitations. (See examples 1 2, 3, )

        3. hook  The motive or "grabber" phrase in a song that generally accompanies the words of the song's title.

        4. motive A short, distinctive musical pattern or figure.  

        5. ostinato A repeated musical figure. 

        6. rondo A composition consisting of a recurring theme alternating with contrasting

  sections.

        7. sonata A work in several movements for one or more instruments.       

    C. Composer Focus: 

          1. Johann Sebastien Bach

March 21, 1685 - July 28, 1750
Baroque Period

Johann Sebastian Bach was born in Eisenach, Germany, where his father was a town musician. Bach came from a long line of composers - over 300 years' worth of Bach's all worked as professional musicians. By the time Johann was 10, both his parents had died, so he was brought up by his older brother, who was a church organist. Johann became a very good organist, too.

Johann Sebastian Bach held three major jobs in his life: first he worked for a duke, then for a prince, and finally, he became director of music at the St. Thomas Church and School in Leipzig, Germany. Even though his job in Leipzig kept him very busy, in his spare time, Bach conducted a group of musicians who liked to get together to perform at a local coffee house.

During his lifetime, people thought of Bach as just an ordinary working musician. No one really knew much about his music until 100 years after his death, when another composer, Felix Mendelssohn, conducted a performance of Bach's St. Matthew Passion.

Bach is now seen as one of the greatest geniuses in music history. He wrote all kinds of music -- for organ and other keyboard instruments, orchestras, choirs, and concertos for many different instrumental combinations.

 

TUESDAY

I. Music Appreciation 

  A. Video:  Dynamics and Tone

  B. Written Assignment: Listening Guide

   The videos feature musician and educator Stephen Titra, who imaginatively combines information about composers, musical eras, and musical concepts with carefully chosen examples from the classical repertoire. To present the musical concepts, Titra not only plays live music on various period and modern instruments but also connects musical ideas to science, history, art - even fashion! He illustrates his narrative with archival pictures and recorded sound from different eras of musical history....." [from the teacher's guide booklet] "The VHS is the NTSC format.

 

 

WEDNESDAY  

         I. Marsalis on Music

             A. Form in Music

             B. Video What does it take to enjoy a long piece of music?  Wynton says, "Learn structure and form, and music unfolds like a story." He then shows us how to identify different forms from Prokofiev to Gershwin, Ellington and Ives.

        

TIME PERIOD

DATES

DEFINTION

DESCRIPTION

COMPOSERS

 

MIDDLE
AGES

 

400-1400 AD

 

Dark Ages

Medieval

 

 

CHORAL

SACRED

 

Priests or Monks

Machaut

 

RENAISSANCE

 

1400-1600

 

Rebirth

 

SACRED

SECULAR

 

Giovanni Gabrielli

 

BAROQUE

 

 

1600-1750

 

Irregular

 

 

COUNTERPOINT

Bach

Handel

Scarlatti

 

CLASSICAL

 

1750-1800

(1827)

 

 

Refined

 

 

 

Simple, Elegant

Tuneful

Mozart

Haydn Beethoven

 

ROMANTIC

1800-1900

Passionate

 

Showmanship

Virtuosity

Beethoven

Chopin

Liszt

MODERN

1900-present

Contemporary

Experimental

Technological

Bartok

Schoenburg

Satie

Scott Joplin
























   

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

THURSDAY 

I. Lecture: Music Forms

   A. Binary form

   B. Ternary form

   C. Rondo form

   D. Theme and Variations

   E. suite

   F. Sonata

   G. Concerto

   H. string quartet

   I.     Scholes (1977) suggested that European classical music had only six main stand-alone forms; simple binary, simple ternary, compound binary, rondo, air with variations, and fugue, although he allowed for several sub-categories and hybrids. Mann (1958), however, while confirming that the fugue has taken on certain structural conventions at times, emphasised that it is primarily a method of composition.

            Where a piece cannot readily be broken down into sectional units (though it might borrow some form from a poem, story or programme) It is said to be through-composed. Such is often the case with pieces named Fantasia, Prelude, Rhapsody, Etude or study, Symphonic poem, Bagatelle (music), Impromptu etc.

     II.   Review Questions (Note: answers may be found in online research or the lecture on Thursday)

          A. What is the usual form for an American popular song?

          B. What is binary form?

          C. Why was the opening pattern of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony used to symbolize victory during the Second World War?

           D. How is a a fugue different from a canon?

           E. What important element  holds together the various movements of sonata or symphony?

      

     

 

FRIDAY  

         I.  Chapter Ten

             A. Written Quiz

                           B. Online Quiz 

       

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Discovering Mexico
Find out basic information on Mexico and Mexican culture.


Discovering Asia
Find out basic information on Asia and Asian Cultures.


Discovering Music
Review music fundamentals concepts.

Education Standards AddressedM-AP-H1

Understand and apply advanced music

vocabulary to describe aesthetic

qualities of musical compositions (1, 4)

M-AP-H2

Distinguish unique characteristics of

music as it reflects concepts of beauty

and qualify of life in various cultures (1, 4, 5)

M-AP-H3 Analyze and express the impact of

music on intellect and emotions (1, 4, 5)

M-AP-H4

Compare and contrast traditional and

technological options available for

artistic expression in music (1, 4)

M-AP-H5

Question/weigh evidence and

information, examine intuitive

reactions, and articulate personal

attitudes toward musical works (1, 2, 5)

M-AP-H6

Evaluate and discuss appropriateness of

behavior for different types of musical

environments (2, 4, 5)

 

 

 

By completing Chapter 9, the students will:

Discover that music, like language and mathematics, is a symbolic system of communication.

Learn that you can respond to a wide range of music.

Become familiar with the Balinese gamelan orchestra and the music of the barong Dance.

Become acquainted with Romanticism and learn about the music of the Romantic Period.

Define related vocabulary.

 

 

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