Our Program

 

 

 

      Bell Schedule

 

FINE ARTS (ART)

     CHAPTER ONE 

          Lectures

          Activity 1            

          Activity2

          Activity 3

          Activity 4

    CHAPTER TWO       

        Lectures 

         Activity 1            

         Activity 2

         Activity 3            

         Activity 4  

CHAPTER THREE    

        Lectures 
 Activity 1      

         Activity 2

        Activity 3            

         Activity 4  

   CHAPTER FOUR   

         Lectures 

          Activity 1          

          Activity 2  

          Activity 3

          Activity 4 

      CHAPTER FIVE

          Activity 1

          Activity2 

          Activity3

          Activity 4

        CHAPTER SIX 

          Activity 1 

           Activity 2   

           Activity 3    

           Activity 4

      CHAPTER SEVEN 

           Activity 1          

           Activity 2

           Activity 3 

           Activity 4 

CHAPTER EIGHT

Activity 1     

         Activity 2        

 Activity 3    

         Activity 4

CHAPTER NINE

         Activity 1        

         Activity 2 

         Activity 3

         Activity 4 

CHAPTER TEN 

           Activity 1 

           Activity 2 

           Activity 3 

           Activity 4

CHAPTER ELEVEN 

Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3

CHAPTER TWELVE 

Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
CHAPTER THIRTEEN  
 Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3

CHAPTER FOURTEEN 

      Activity 1       
Activity 2 
Activity 3
CHAPTER FIFTEEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
CHAPTER SIXTEEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
CHAPTER EIGHTEEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3

 

  

 

LESSON PLANS SEMESTER I
WEEK ONE
WEEK TWO
WEEK THREE
WEEK FOUR
WEEK FIVE
WEEK SIX
WEEK SEVEN
WEEK EIGHT
WEEK NINE
WEEK TEN
WEEK ELEVEN
WEEK TWELVE
WEEK THIRTEEN
WEEK FOURTEEN
WEEK FIFTEEN
WEEK SIXTEEN
WEEK SEVENTEEN
WEEK EIGHTEEN

 

LESSON PLANS SEMESTER II
WEEK ONE
WEEK TWO
WEEK THREE
WEEK FOUR
WEEK FIVE
WEEK SIX
WEEK SEVEN
WEEK EIGHT
WEEK NINE
WEEK TEN
WEEK ELEVEN
WEEK TWELVE
WEEK THIRTEEN
WEEK FOURTEEN
WEEK FIFTEEN
WEEK SIXTEEN
WEEK SEVENTEEN
WEEK EIGHTEEN

 

      FINE ARTS SURVEY (ART)

 

                                                   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

MONDAY  Islamic Art

Objective(s): (SWBAT) The students identify fundamental concepts of Early Christian, Byzantine, and Islamic Art.


Bell Ringer:  Define the following related terms: 1) catacombs - underground tunnels in which early Christians met and buried their dead, some catacombs also contained chapels and meeting rooms.
2)
campanile - a bell tower near, or attached to, a church
3)
mosaic - a decoration made with small pieces of glass and stone set in cement
4) pier - a massive vertical pillar that is used to support and arch or vault made of cut stone.
5)
Koran - the holy scripture of Islam
6)
mosque - Muslim place of worship
7)
minaret - a spiral tower attached to a mosque
8)
muezzin - a prayer caller
9)
mihrab - a niche in the wall of a mosque that indicates the direction of Mecca and is large enough to accommodate a single standing figure.
10)
alcazar - a fortified Moorish palace


Anticipatory Set: (Hook)


Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) The rising power of Christianity touched on every aspect of life, especially the visual arts. Before A.D. 313, Christianity had been illegal in the Roman Empire, so art was created in catacombs, or underground passageways. Unlike those who believed in the Roman religion, Christians believed Christ to be their savior. Early Christian art was meant to illustrate Christ’s glory and tell the story of his life. This art had hidden meanings, in which common Roman features such as animals served as symbols for Christian ideas


Guided Practice: (TW/SW)  Catacombs and Early Christian Architecture


Independent Practice: Write a paragraph summarizing the presentation on Early Christian architecture.


Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Complete the listenng summary and submit for creit.


Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment: Chapter 13 Online Quiz


Materials:

 

 

TUESDAY

Objective(s): (SWBAT) The students identify the city of Byzantium, (Istanbul, and Constantinople) as the center of art activity as the center of power in Eastern Europe for 1000 years after the 5th and 6th centuries.


Bell Ringer: Travel to Byzantium, Constantinople, and Istanbul


Anticipatory Set: (Hook) Where is Byzantium? A Tale of Three Cities

When the emperor Constantine finally granted Christians the right to practice their faith, churches were built in the West using the form of the basilica. They were decorated with mosaics, designs made with small pieces of glass and stone set in cement. While the Roman West declined and the popes took over in place of the Roman rulers, the eastern part of the Roman Empire continued to thrive. The city of Constantinople was a great cultural center where brilliant art was created in the name of Christianity. There huge domed churches such as Hagia Sophia were built using a central plan. Dazzling mosaics decorated this church and told familiar stories from the Bible. When the emperor Justinian extended his control into the West in A.D. 540, he had the great church of San Vitale built in Ravenna. Mosaics in the church’s apse at the end of the nave show Justinian and his wife, Theodora, with the church authorities.


Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) Song: Constantinople (Listening)


Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Byzantium (/bɪˈzćntiəm/ bih-ZAN-tee-uhm; Greek: Βυζάντιον Byzántion) was the ancient Greek city on the site that later became Constantinople (modern Istanbul). It was founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 657 BC. The city was rebuilt and reinaugurated as the new capital of the Roman Empire by Emperor Constantine I in 330 AD and subsequently renamed Constantinople. The city remained the capital of the Byzantine Empire until 1453, when it was conquered and became the capital of the Ottoman Empire. Since the establishment of modern Turkey in 1923, the Turkish name of the city, Istanbul, has replaced the name Constantinople in the West.


Independent Practice: Survey the Art and Architecture of Byzantium


Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Complete Listening Summary and submit for credit.


Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment: Chapter Thirteen Online Quiz


Materials:

 

WEDNESDAY

 

 

Objective(s): (SWBAT) The students identify the attributes of Islamic art and culture.

 

 

 

 

 


Bell Ringer: The  Five Pillars of Islam (handout)


Anticipatory Set: (Hook)  Lets Look at World Religions: Islam     In the seventh century A.D. a religion known as Islam emerged in the Middle East. Islam is based on the teachings of the prophet Muhammad, who said there is only one god, Allah. Today more than 925 million Muslims recognize Muhammad as the Messenger of God. The messages he received were recorded in the Koran, the holy scripture of Islam. The early center of Islam was the Fertile Crescent. Here Muslim builders built places of worship known as mosques. The massive ninth-century mosque in Samarra, Iraq, had a minaret, or tower, from which people were called to group worship.


Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) Islamic Art and Architecture


Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Use the textbook, Discovering Art, to answer the following questions about Islamic Art and culture.


1. Define arabesque.

 

2. Describe the Alhambra. What part of the Alhambra's architecture is most famous?

 

3. What is a mosque?

 

4. Why is the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem important to both Christians and Moslems?

 

5. What were some of the characteristics of Islamic book illustration?

 

6. Describe the Great Mosque of Damascus.


Independent Practice:


Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Complete the listening summary on the Five Pillars of Islam. 


Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment: Chapter 13 Online Quiz


Materials:

 

 

THURSDAY 

Objective(s): (SWBAT)The students explore early Medieval Art.


Bell Ringer: King Aurthor and Knights of the Round Table


Anticipatory Set: (Hook)  Early Medieval Art
The Middle Ages is a period that spans over 1000 years. The first half of the medieval era was a time of much turmoil ad change. The Roman empire had collapsed, having been overrun by the Visigoths, the Huns, and the Vandals. Because the Roman empire no long put up a defense against European tribes, these tribes were able to move through Euorpe to look for permanent homes. In the Migration period (400-600), few paintings or large buildings were produced. Tribes needed to carry their art and treasures with them. Therefore, artwork was entirely confined to portable objects such as ornaments, weapons, and objects for daily use.

Most medieval tribes were Christian, but they also had a pagan tradition. Dreadful monsters and dragons were featured in their songs and epics. Geometric designs and animal motifs were common in their decoration and design.

Manuscript illumination became an important art from. Not only could books be easily carried, they were of great use to missionaries. Christian missionaries tried to establish the authority of the Church among the wandering tribes and bring stability. Illuminated manuscripts were drawn by monks in secluded monasteries throughout Europe. 



Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Hagia Sophia


Independent Practice:  Lecture Notes and Summary of Hagia Sophia 


Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Introduction to the Medieval Era "First Knight" (video clips)


Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment: Chapter Thirteen Online Quiz


Materials:

 


Materials: Teacher workstation and computer projector, Internet Access, Student Desktop Computers,  Students' black folders organized with semester notes.etc

 

 

FRIDAY  - No Classes: Teacher In-service

 


 

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