Our Program

 

 

 

CHAPTER ONE

Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3                      

CHAPTER TWO
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3   

CHAPTER THREE
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER FOUR
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER FIVE
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER SIX
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER SEVEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER EIGHT
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER NINE
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER TEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER ELEVEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER 17
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER 18
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER 19
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER 21
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3 

CHAPTER 24
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3  

 

 

LESSON PLANS
WEEK ONE
WEEK TWO
WEEK THREE
WEEK FOUR
WEEK FIVE
WEEK SIX
WEEK SEVEN
WEEK EIGHT
WEEK NINE
WEEK TEN
WEEK ELEVEN
WEEK TWELVE
WEEK THIRTEEN
WEEK FOURTEEN
WEEK FIFTEEN
WEEK SIXTEEN
WEEK SEVENTEEN
WEEK EIGHTEEN

Fine Arts Survey: CHAPTER EIGHT
 
 

 

 

           Alone and Together (Overview)

                                                                     Close-up of Electric Guitar Player

Music can be a solitary act -- a person playing a guitar or shakuhachi or singing alone unaccompanied. You have probably whistled, hummed, sung, or even played an instrument by yourself, when you had the privacy to express yourself musically without feeling the pressure to perform or having the fear of being criticized. During these private moments, music becomes a means of personal expression. We speak through it, and it speaks back to us in a very intimate way. We can lose ourselves in its magic. 

Performing music is an expressive act. Sometimes we might perform music alone as a way to get in touch with our feelings. At other times, we perform with others to achieve a social expression. 

 

 

Chapter Eight - Day One 


Objective(s): (SWBAT) Find out how people make music alone and together.

Bell Ringer: Chapter Eight Vocabulary

          1. call and response A question and answer pattern in which a group responds to a leader.

        2. canon A musical form using exact imitation.

        3. conductor  The director of an orchestra, choir, or other performing group.

        4. counterpoint Music that counters one note against another. 

        5. homophonic texture Musical texture in which a single melodic line is supported by chordal accompaniment. 

        6. imitation Exact repetition or resemblance between parts.

        7. monophony A single, melodic line with no accompaniment.

        8. neumes Marks written over the words of a songs.

        9. polychoral music Music for several groups performing 

            in answer to each other.

        10. polyphony Simultaneous combination of different melodies and rhythms.

        11. solmization A method of sight-singing by syllables.

        12. texture  The way sounds are woven together.

        13.  more terms 



Anticipatory Set: (Hook) Chapter Overview
 

Music can be a solitary act -- a person playing a guitar or shakuhachi or singing alone unaccompanied. You have probably whistled, hummed, sung, or even played an instrument by yourself, when you had the privacy to express yourself musically without feeling the pressure to perform or having the fear of being criticized. During these private moments, music becomes a means of personal expression. We speak through it, and it speaks back to us in a very intimate way. We can lose ourselves in its magic. 

Performing music is an expressive act. Sometimes we might perform music alone as a way to get in touch with our feelings. At other times, we perform with others to achieve a social expression. 



Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) Composer Focus:

       1. Giovanni Gabrielli (Notebook/Notes)

         Giovanni Gabrieli (c. 1554/1557 August 12, 1612) was an Italian composer and organist. He was one of the most influential musicians of his time, and represents the culmination of the style of the Venetian School, at the time of the shift from Renaissance to Baroque idioms.

     2. John Rutter "Spreading Good Cheer"

           a. Written Assignment

           b. Listening Summary



Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Writing Template

Independent Practice: Take notes and complete a short biography on John Rutter; one paragraph. 

Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: The Science of Music

Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment:
Chapter Eight Assessments

             A. Written Quiz (page 1, 2)

             B.  Chapter Eight Online Quiz

 

Chapter Eight - Day Two

      

Objective(s): (SWBAT) Discover Native American flute music.

DO NOW: Notes - Native American Flute Music

According to Native American legends, the flute was given to the Indian people by the Creator for enjoyment, easing loneliness, and other important purposes. Some tribes used the flute as a courting instrument. Other tribes used the flute for quite, introspective moments.


   


LECTURE:  

          A. Native American Flute Therapy 

          B. The History of Native American Flute Music

                Aaron White takes us on a journey through native history and culture as seen in the craft of the hand-made native American flute. He showcases a number of his own hand-made flutes, describing how they are made and performing beautiful and haunting native songs.  

 

          C. Sample - Native American Flute Maker

           D. Listening - Native American Flute Music



Independent Practice:

Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket:

Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment: What is the origin of the DO-RE-MI syllables?

      

Chapter Eight - Day Three

Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) Lecture - Solfiege
          A. Introduction to the Scale
          B. Video - "Do-Re-Mi" (from the Sound of Music)


Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Texture in Music (lecture)

            A. Define melody

           B.  Lecture Activity: Music  Ace 2 Session-Melody




Objective(s):
(SWBAT)
The students define triads. The students complete a lesson on the "Introduction to Harmony". The students survey the music and culture of the Middle Ages.

Bell Ringer: Triads (Notes)

      A. Lecture: In music and music theory, a triad is a three-note chord that can be stacked in thirds.[1] Its members, when actually stacked in thirds, from lowest pitched tone to highest, are called:

          B.  Notes: In the late Renaissance, western art music shifted from more "horizontal" contrapuntal approach toward chord-progressions requiring a more "vertical" approach, thus relying more heavily on the triad as the basic building block of functional harmony.


Anticipatory Set: (Hook) Music Ace 2: "Introduction to Harmony"

Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) Music of the Middle Ages (notes)

During the Middle Ages, Western music was monophonic, consisting of a single line of  melody. The notes on this decorative page show a melody line combined with the text below it.  Medieval composers were determined to find a way to combine different sound to broaden the range of musical expression. Since singing and playing together  required a way to coordinate the performers, the simplest kind of organization---everyone singing the same tune. 

 



Guided Practice: (TW/SW)  Music of the Middle Ages (Video; Educational Video Network)

   A. Written Assignment

   B. Listening Guide



Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Complete listening guide on the Music of the Middle Ages and submit for credit.

Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment: What is a musical triad?
Materials:

 

 

THURSDAY Music Theory Review

 

 

Objective(s): (SWBAT) Students copy and answer Chapter Eight study guide questions.

Bell Ringer:

To help his chorister learn to sing more easily, Guido of Arezzo (c. 991-1033), an Italian Benedictine monk and music theorist, devised a system of solmization, a method of sight-singing by syllables. This method forms the basis of the Western DO-Re-MI system of solfiege or sight-singing

Anticipatory Set: (Hook) Do-Re-Mi

Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) Lecture - Solfiege
          A. Introduction to the Scale
          B. Video - Do-Re-Mi(from the Sound of Music) 

Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Chapter Eight Study Guide Questions

A. How did some Native Americans use the flute for courting?
B. What popular music styles use call and response form?
C. What is a musical triad?
D. What is the origin of the DO-RE-MI syllables?
E. What kind of music was Giovanni Gabrieli famous for?
F. Describe how a performer might feel when  performing alone as compared to performing in a group situation.
G. Explain in your own words, how a conductor coordinates the performance of a group of musicians.


Independent Practice:

Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Complete notes and copy Chapter Eight Study Guide Questions.

Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment:    

           Chapter Eight Assessments

             A. Written Quiz (page 1, 2)
    
        B.  Chapter Eight Online Quiz


 

 

 

 

FRIDAY

        

Objective(s): (SWBAT) The students complete Chapter Eight Assessments.

Bell Ringer:  Written Quiz (page 1, 2)

Anticipatory Set: (Hook) None

Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) None

Guided Practice: (TW/SW) None

Independent Practice:

Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Submit Chapter[= Eight Written Quiz (page 1, 2) 
Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment:  Chapter Eight Online Quiz

        

 

 

G1, G4, DC, NG

 

 

 

edutopia


Discovering Mexico
Find out basic information on Mexico and Mexican culture.


Discovering Asia
Find out basic information on Asia and Asian Cultures.


Discovering Music
Review music fundamentals concepts.

Education Standards AddressedM-AP-H1

Understand and apply advanced music

vocabulary to describe aesthetic

qualities of musical compositions (1, 4)

M-AP-H2

Distinguish unique characteristics of

music as it reflects concepts of beauty

and qualify of life in various cultures (1, 4, 5)

M-AP-H3 Analyze and express the impact of

music on intellect and emotions (1, 4, 5)

M-AP-H4

Compare and contrast traditional and

technological options available for

artistic expression in music (1, 4)

M-AP-H5

Question/weigh evidence and

information, examine intuitive

reactions, and articulate personal

attitudes toward musical works (1, 2, 5)

M-AP-H6

Evaluate and discuss appropriateness of

behavior for different types of musical

environments (2, 4, 5)

 

 

 

By completing Chapter 8, the students will:

Find out how people make music alone and together.

Learn to recognize and describe basic textures of music.

Be able to describe the characteristics of the concerto.

Define related vocabulary.