Our Program

 

 

 

      Bell Schedule

 

  

FINE ARTS (ART)

     CHAPTER ONE 

          Lectures

          Activity 1            

          Activity2

          Activity 3

          Activity 4

    CHAPTER TWO       

        Lectures 

         Activity 1            

         Activity 2

         Activity 3            

         Activity 4  

CHAPTER THREE    

        Lectures 
 Activity 1      

         Activity 2

        Activity 3            

         Activity 4  

   CHAPTER FOUR   

         Lectures 

          Activity 1          

          Activity 2  

          Activity 3

          Activity 4 

      CHAPTER FIVE

          Activity 1

          Activity2 

          Activity3

          Activity 4

        CHAPTER SIX 

          Activity 1 

           Activity 2   

           Activity 3    

           Activity 4

      CHAPTER SEVEN 

           Activity 1          

           Activity 2

           Activity 3 

           Activity 4 

CHAPTER EIGHT

Activity 1     

         Activity 2        

 Activity 3    

         Activity 4

CHAPTER NINE

         Activity 1        

         Activity 2 

         Activity 3

         Activity 4 

CHAPTER TEN 

           Activity 1 

           Activity 2 

           Activity 3 

           Activity 4

CHAPTER ELEVEN 

Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3

CHAPTER TWELVE 

Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
CHAPTER THIRTEEN  
 Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3

CHAPTER FOURTEEN 

      Activity 1       
Activity 2 
Activity 3
CHAPTER FIFTEEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
CHAPTER SIXTEEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3
CHAPTER EIGHTEEN
Activity 1
Activity 2
Activity 3

 

  

LESSON PLANS SEMESTER I
WEEK ONE
WEEK TWO
WEEK THREE
WEEK FOUR
WEEK FIVE
WEEK SIX
WEEK SEVEN
WEEK EIGHT
WEEK NINE
WEEK TEN
WEEK ELEVEN
WEEK TWELVE
WEEK THIRTEEN
WEEK FOURTEEN
WEEK FIFTEEN
WEEK SIXTEEN
WEEK SEVENTEEN
WEEK EIGHTEEN

 

LESSON PLANS SEMESTER II
WEEK ONE
WEEK TWO
WEEK THREE
WEEK FOUR
WEEK FIVE
WEEK SIX
WEEK SEVEN
WEEK EIGHT
WEEK NINE
WEEK TEN
WEEK ELEVEN
WEEK TWELVE
WEEK THIRTEEN
WEEK FOURTEEN
WEEK FIFTEEN
WEEK SIXTEEN
WEEK SEVENTEEN
WEEK EIGHTEEN

 

      FINE ARTS SURVEY (ART)

 

                                                   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

CHAPTER ONE-DAY ONE

 

Objective(s): (SWBAT) The students review the course goals and syllabus. The students survey the question "What is Art?".


Bell Ringer: Course Syllabus (handout)


Anticipatory Set: (Hook) What kinds of behaviors are conducive to student success?


Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW) Chapter One: The Language of Art

A. Lesson 1:
A work of art is the visual expression of an idea or experience. Visual art includes many types of media. It is used to communicate with others in ways that go beyond words.

To understand a work of art, you must develop the ability to perceive.

To perceive is to become deeply aware through the senses of the special nature of a visual object.

People create art to serve many functions.

(1) They create art to express personal feelings.

(2) They use art to express a family, community, or civilizationís identity.

(3) Often, artists create art to express spiritual beliefs.

(4) Some artists use new ideas and technologies to give functional objects, such as cars and buildings, new and interesting forms.

(5) Artists often create art to teach people.

This book will help you understand and recognize all the visual arts.

 


Guided Practice: (TW/SW) What is Art?

Independent Practice: Write a paragraph to summarize What is Art?

Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Art in My Life

Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment:

 

 

WEDNESDAY
Objective(s): (SWBAT) The students review the course goals and syllabus. The students survey define Chapter One Vocabulary. The students define travel and tourism. The students survey art to describe the general attributes.



Bell Ringer:  
Chapter One Vocabulary

1) art historian - looks for objective facts about an artwork

2) museum - provides physical space for preserving, exhibiting and viewing works of art

3) artwork - records history, provides enjoyment, and persuades people

4) aesthetician - is a scholar who specializes in identifying criteria to use in determining the significance of artwork

5) fine art (high art) art that is created for aesthetic purposes. Usually paintings and sculpture preserved in art museums and private collections 

6) applied art - any type of art done with a practical application, or, the application of design and aesthetics to objects of function and everyday use. Examples include: Industrial and commercial art, graphic design, fashion design and interior design, architecture, and photography

7) social art - art intended to engage the public to create social value. This art often includes the public, and is intended to draw attention to social issues

8) art criticism - helps you make an informed judgment about an artwork

9) aesthetics - a method of study or branch of philosophy where information is gathered about artists' influences

10) content - refers to a work's essence or what is being depicted

11) elements of art - the basic visual symbols in the language of art

12) form - the term form refers to the work's style, techniques, and media used; and, how the elements of design are implemented

13) media - the plural form of medium 140 medium - the material used to make an art object


Anticipatory Set: (Hook) The History of Travel and Tourism

Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Survey Art

  A. 23 Green Stripe (Henri Matisse)

  B.  The Westwood Children (Joshua Johnson)

  C. Embarkation to Cythera (Jean-Antoine Watteau)

  D. Gayer Anderson Cat

  E.  The Wind (Hans Hoffman)

 

 

Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Write and define each vocabulary term in notebooks. Complete the assessment sheet for travel and tourism.

 


 

Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment:  


 

Materials:



       

THURSDAY


Bell Ringer: Review SLT Chart (Online Tests Scores from Semester I)

Anticipatory Set: (Hook) A Basic Introduction to Art

Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW)



Guided Practice: (TW/SW)



Independent Practice: THE FUNCTIONS OF ART

Can you tell the difference?

A. Fine Art(High Art) Superior to other forms of art.

Art that is created for aesthetic purposes. Usually

paintings and sculpture preserved in art museums

and private collections.

B. Applied Art- Any type of art done with a practical

application; or, the application of design and

aesthetics to objects of function and everyday use.

Examples include: Industrial and commercial art,

graphic design, fashion design and interior

design, architecture, and photographry.

C. Social Art -Art intended to engage the public to

create social value. This art often includes the

public, and is intended to draw attention to social

issues.


Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Determine the "function of art" in each of the following examples. Art Quiz


Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment: Art Quiz

 

THURSDAY 

I. Art Quiz

II. Art Auction  

III. Metropolitan Museum of Art

IV. Study Guide for Online Quiz No. 1

V. Decoding a Credit Line

Credit line-Information identifying a work of art. A credit line usually includes the artists name, the title of the work, year completed, medium used, size (height, weight,  and depth), location (gallery, museum, or collection and city), donors, and date donated.

Judith Leyster. Self Portrait. c. 1635. Oil on canvas. 72.3 X 65.3 cm (29 3/6 X 25 5/8). National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Gift of Mr. & Mrs. Robert Woods Bliss.

 

Note: Judith Leyster was a Dutch woman who dared to break rules. In the early seventeenth century women artists were expected to paint delicate still lifes, but Leyster chose to do portraits and genre paintings (scenes and subjects from everyday life)

Look at the portrait. The credit line beneath the caption is full of information. Here is what each part means:

     Judith Leyster The artist's name

      Self Portrait The title of the work always appears in italics.

     c. 1635 The year the work was completed. "c" stands for circa, which means "about:. It is used before approximate dates.

     Oil on canvas. The medium used.

      72.3 X 65.3 cm (29 3/6 X 25 5/8) The size. The first number is always the height, the second number is the width, and, if the work is three dimensional, a third number indicates the depth.

     The National Gallery of Art The museum, gallery, or collection where the work is kept.

     Washington, D.C. The location of the museum, gallery, or collection.

     Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bliss The names of the donors.

 

FRIDAY

 

Objective(s): (SWBAT) The students practice decoding credit lines in art.

Bell Ringer: Art Auction

Anticipatory Set: (Hook) Metropolitan Museum of Art

Direct Instruction/Modeling: (TW/SW)
Credit line-Information identifying a work of art. A credit line usually includes the artists name, the title of the work, year completed, medium used, size (height, weight, and depth), location (gallery, museum, or collection and city), donors, and date donated.

Guided Practice: (TW/SW) Decoding a Credit Line

Independent Practice:

Closure/ Wrap up & Exit Ticket: Study Guide for Online Quiz No. 1

Checking for Understanding (Possible Questions)/ Lesson Assessment: Online Quiz
Materials:

          B. Careers in the Visual Arts
 
 

 

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